IN OTHER ROOMS OTHER WONDERS BY DANIYAL MUEENUDDIN PDF

July 31, 2020   |   by admin

In Other Rooms, Other Wonders illuminates a place and people as it describes the overlapping worlds of an extended Pakistani landowning family. In Other Rooms, Other Wonders. By Daniyal Mueenuddin Ushered into the living room by the secretary after a quarter of an hour, Husna. Reading Daniyal Mueenuddin’s mesmerizing first collection, “In Other Rooms, Other Wonders,” is like watching a game of blackjack, the shrewd.

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Thanks for telling us about the problem. Return to Book Page. A major literary debut that explores class, culture, power, and desire among the ruling and servant classes of Pakistan.

In the spirit of Mueenurdin Dubliners and Turgenev’s A Sportsman’s Sketches, Daniyal Mueenuddin’s collection of linked stories illuminates a place and a people through an examination of the entwined lives of landowners and their retainers on the Gurmani fami A major literary debut that explores class, culture, power, and desire among the ruling and servant classes of Pakistan. In the spirit of Joyce’s Dubliners and Turgenev’s A Sportsman’s Sketches, Daniyal Mueenuddin’s collection of linked stories illuminates a place and a people through an examination of the entwined lives of landowners and their retainers on the Gurmani family farm in the countryside outside of Lahore, Pakistan.

An aging feudal landlord’s household staff, the villagers who depend on his favor, and a network of relations near and far who have sought their fortune in the cities confront the advantages and constraints of station, the dissolution of old dajiyal, and the shock of change. Mueenuddin bares—at times humorously, at times tragically—the complexities of Pakistani class and culture and presents a vivid picture of a time and a place, of the dniyal powers and the new, as the Pakistani feudal order is undermined and transformed.

Hardcoverpages.

Pulitzer Prize Ln for FictionO. To see what your friends thought of this book, please sign up. Where is the element of sexual harassment or it is in actual or fake situation? Lists with This Book. Jan 29, Will Byrnes rated it it was amazing Shelves: Mueenuddin has put together a collection of stories that offers a less than flattering portrait of Pakistan.

But while the social structures that come under his gaze are less than ideal, his writing is top notch, his ability to create memorable and accessible characters is superb.

The organizing methodology here is that each of the stories connects with K. Harouni, patriarch of a family in a declining landed class.

He is almost an innocent, not noticing that his servants wnoders taking extreme, an Mueenuddin has put together a collection of stories that offers a less than flattering portrait of Pakistan.

In Other Rooms, Other Wonders

He is almost an innocent, not noticing that his servants are taking extreme, and criminal advantage of him. Yet corruption is ubiquitous in this world. In Our Lady of Paris, the young, American-educated Sohail tries to do so, in a way, by marrying an American, but her conservative mother puts the kibosh on that.

He later marries another American, but once married, she pretty much goes native, so represents an infusion of DNA rather than actual change. In Lily, the character of the title was and remains a spoiled urban child. In A Spoiled Man, the elderly Rezak, who is ultimately content with his place, is abused when, at least in his own mind, he aspires to something more.

Women have to sleep with higher-level servants in households in order to get by. But even when they corral a member of a higher class, it ultimately ends badly for them.

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In Provide, Provide a trusted servant is really a serpent. In A Spoiled Man we learn of a business that the police engage in outside their legal duties. While the stories here would certainly go a long way to influencing one to cancel any relocation plans, oyher are tales beautifully told, with engaging, rounded characters. Through their eyes we get to mueenuxdin a bit of what the country is all about. But at least one writer is attempting to create some order and beauty from the mess.

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View all 6 comments.

In Other Rooms, Other Wonders: Daniyal Mueenuddin: Bloomsbury Paperbacks

Apr 26, Teresa rated it really liked it. Perhaps it’s not the best idea to learn contemporary sociology from fictional short stories, but it’s not a bad place to start if the stories are as good as these.

Twentieth- and earlyst century Pakistan is presented here through the eyes of the landowners and their peons. All levels of society the ‘middle’ class is glancingly represented in the landowners’ ‘managers’ work the system, some in order to survive, others to get as much as they can.

The rich aren’t necessarily getting richer, Perhaps it’s not the best idea to learn contemporary sociology from fictional short stories, but it’s not a bad place to start if the stories are as good as these. The rich aren’t necessarily getting richer, in some cases they are merely keeping up appearances, more important to them than actually working. Memorable female characters, who use their youth and sex appeal in similar rooma, are the focus of some of the stories.

Though the families they come from and the men they ‘use’ and who use them are different from each other, their stories are basically the same — intentional, I’m sure.

As shown in “About a Burning Girl,” the girl is the last thing any of the men are considering. That said, I may end up remembering longer the older male characters: Depicting a society where protocol and the family you come from means so much though increasingly not as much as it used tothe author’s use of recurring characters and their descendants is effective. Subtle metaphors point out that change is not only a struggle that comes with a cost; oother that it otherr also frustratingly hard to achieve, if at all.

A sense of place is very strong in all the stories, including one set in France. View all 17 comments. This collection of stories is insightful and by turns luminous and bleak. Mueenuddin takes bh stories of a wide range of people, from poor servants to the landed rich, to form a cross section of Pakistani society, the common thread being their relationship to an old aristocratic land-owner and his family. It is full of poetic detail and Mueenuddin’s characters are complex, fully realised and sympathetic, but the overall picture is of a divided society in which very few stories have happy ending This collection of stories is insightful and by turns luminous and bleak.

It is full of musenuddin detail and Mueenuddin’s characters are complex, fully realised and sympathetic, but the overall picture is of a divided society in which very few stories have happy endings.

Considering the setting, the stories feel very secular, with very few overtly religious elements – it is much more about families, money, power and influence.

I suspect that many of these stories would stand up well to multiple readings. I am surprised at the amount of positive reviews this short story collection seems to be receiving, with some over-enthusiastic reviewers comparing Mueenuddin’s prose to that of Salman Rushdiewhich I find very hilarious.

Rushdie’s prose is complex, lyrical and iridescent, whereas Mueenuddin’s prose is restrained in a bad way and the sentences irregular and pointy that it stings your eyes to read them. The dialogue could be best described as theatrical and conf Overrated, pretentious twaddle.

The dialogue could be best described as theatrical and confusing, I kept thinking who on the earth talks like that in Pakistan? I concede that few descriptive passages does evoke a sense of ‘rural Pakistan’, but it is is hardly worth praising when you consider the flimsy plots, repetitive themes and unconvincing characters.

The stories are obviously targeted for western audience, perhaps with the intention of portraying an ‘exotic’ image of Pakistan, miles away from the violent and fundamentalist image that western media seem rokms purport. Well, it doesn’t do a very good job of it. Almost every character is nueenuddin of any scruples.

There are sordid old men perving after younger women and one might actually sympathise with the women for being so dependent on men, yet they are equally as bad as men, actively manipulating and seducing them, not caring that they might be cheating on their husbands. Basically, it is shown that for a woman to gain stability or climb the social ladder in such a patriarchal society, all they have to do is open their legs to any man who can provide them with these assurances, which is a very bleak outlook for Pakistani women.

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The role of religion is blatantly ignored. In fact, Islam is hardly mentioned when it forms such a huge part of people’s public and private life. Most of the stories are concerned with a land-owning feudal family and the peasants who work for them – the elites and the poor, who tend to be the least religious of all people.

It’s the middle classes – millions of them residing in city flats or suburbia, who are the most religious, economically independent and do not owe any allegiance to a moronic feudal lord, but are mueenudddin to be conveniently ignored by Mueenuddin, which is disappointing.

In short, I hate this book and would not recommend! View all 3 comments. Feb 17, Ruby rated it liked it. Clear, easy to follow, and very well written. Only one small problem – and maybe this is a problem that only applies to me – I felt like I toher reading a book by Jhumpa Lahiri, or Anita Desai, or even Salman Rushdie. It seems, to me, that many authors from the far east are feeding off of each others literary techniques What is it about brown authors using the same style of writing?

The same extended metaphor that goes on for pages. The flowery language that’s used to describe every Good Read. The flowery language that’s used to describe every tiny detail. I know many people appreciate this writing style, but Muernuddin a little tired of it. I was looking forward to something original – hey a book by a Pakistani author, about Pakistan!

What I got – a book about Pakistan, yes, but it could have just as easily been set in India. And yes, to many the difference is insignificant and for the most part undetectable, but not to me. Our histories are intertwined, but our cultures and very different. mueenkddin

Unfortunately I went into this book thinking Mueenuddin would write about the Pakistani society I was brought up in – that was probably my fault and I should not go into books assuming such things. This subgroup is actually incredibly significant as it basically represents how religion, politics, culture, tradition, and the push for modernity clash. Maybe I’m overly critical, and again, I’m not blaming the author – he probably grew up in the world of politicians and the Pakistani elite and had domestic help of his own, and therefore all he knew.

And maybe all he was trying to do was create a social commentary illustrating the disconnect between two specific social classes in Pakistan.

Maybe I just need to write a book about the Pakistanis that I am used to dealing with Regardless, I would still recommend this book to anyone who enjoyed short stories and learning about different cultures.

View all 5 comments. May 29, Tatiana rated it really liked it Recommends it for: I know next to woneers about Pakistan, aside from the fact that this country seems to be overrun by terrorists, so reading this Pulitzer prize nominated collection of short stories gave me a new perspective on the country and people who live in it. The eight loosely interconnected stories revolve around K. Harouni – a rich Pakistani landowner – and a network of his servants, employees, relatives and opportunists.

In “Saleema” a young maid seeks patronage in Harouni’s household in the beds of o I know next to nothing about Pakistan, aside from the fact that this country seems to be overrun by terrorists, so reading this Pulitzer prize nominated collection of short stories gave me a new perspective on the country and people who live in it. In “Saleema” a young maid seeks patronage in Danihal household in the beds of older, more influential servants, until she falls in love and is later discarded by the man who must honor his first family.